Book published!

Excited to announce that I’ve joined the ranks of published authors, and some illustrious colleagues – I’m Chapter 19, “Immersive Media and Branding: How Being a Brand Will Change and Expand in the Age of True Immersion” in the just-published-today Handbook of Research on the Global Impacts and Roles of Immersive Media.

My chapter explores the impact immersive technologies—augmented reality and virtual reality—will have on consumer branding and business in the near and longer term future. Weaving multiple use cases and examples throughout, I discuss the next phase of experiential marketing: how immersive branding will develop as spatial computing becomes more mainstream, and how brands can start thinking about how they can leverage the technology.

I also examine the rise of virtual influencers, how they will affect social media marketing—and how artificial intelligence will ultimately enable true one-to-one interaction with customers through virtual avatars. Finally, I outline and discuss the risks, rules and recommendations for how to successfully proceed as a brand curious about how to best harness the technologies.

This was a great experience, and I want to thank Jacquelyn (Jacki) Morie for the opportunity to be included, and for being an editor par excellence.

Link to purchase here: https://www.igi-global.com/book/handbook-research-global-impacts-roles/236585

Going to be a published author!

So my first professional book chapter’s been officially submitted, “Immersive Media and Branding: How being a brand will change and expand in the age of true immersion” (could still be changed) for all those curious. It is about virtual and augmented reality, and what it will mean for brands.

Among other things, I talk a lot about how artificial intelligence and how it will inform digital avatars, which are fully fleshed out 3D interactive brand ambassadors. Fascinating thing to think about; literally fleshing out what your brand is, and what that will mean for interacting with consumers.

A shout out to the Cortney Harding of Friends with Holograms, Samantha Wolfe of We are Phase 2, Alejandro Mainetto of EY, Alan Smithson of XR Ignite Community Hub and Virtual Accelerator and Robert Spierenburg of All Things Media for their contributions! And to Jacki Morie of All These Worlds LLC for both accepting my proposal for inclusion, and being very kind for putting up with my questions throughout. She is very patient.

It still need to go though peer review, but should be in the January publication of the tentatively titled,”Global Impacts and Roles of Immersive Media.”

Is Projection Mapping Augmented Reality?

Is projection mapping augmented reality?

I’ve been mulling this over on and off since a few years ago, since being utterly mesmerized by Amon Tobin’s projection mapping concert.  And since this made the rounds in 2015. My knee jerk reaction is – no!

Upon further reflection, I’m not so sure. It augments the real world with enhanced data; so why not? Does augmented reality have to mean enhanced information, or does it include *any* data overlay (even just the pretty kind) – and so what if the digital being overlaid, maps to the surface and doesn’t extend it? Does it require that the augmented data only be seen through a screen?

This spectacular example of  projection mapping brought the issue back in my mind.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science’s Energy City installation in Wiess Energy Hall spent 2 years developing this 2,500 square feet cutting edge projection mapping installation, using 32 projectors, 11 media servers, and 6 kilometers of fiber. Called “Energy City”, it’s a 3D miniature landscape representing the city of Houston Texas. Custom content is synced with physical animations to bring the city to life.

Because we’re in the beginning of all of this, there’s a lot of discussion {argument} over semantics. Ref: Kevin Kelly‘s recent Mirrorworld article for Wired answered in short order by Ori Inbar‘s “Mirrorworld v. AR Cloud or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Spatial Future” – where he discusses using the term “Mirrorworld” as that means, reflection, rather than enhancement. AR/VR/XR/MR – what do we *call* it all is a heated discussion right now. While I’m staying out of that one (although for the record’s sake, I prefer “Mixed reality” for it all) – I can live with Projection Mapping being considered AR.

A minor point, but one worth chewing on, if only briefly. Does it really matter? Will this particular rose smell as sweet with any of those names? – I think it matters, in that it makes the whole already confusing to the mass market subject, that more confusing. Does it really matter that VR is immersive and AR overlays onto the physical world, when those boundaries are blurring? Are we parsing too properly, and missing sight of the bigger picture? – which is, that whatever you call it, the AR/VR/MR/XR industry needs to grow.